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Comrade TruthTeller's Infobox, Graphics & Stuff Thread

Alex Richards

She needs an artificial Mountain, not AV
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
Didn't notice that.

Um, that's not going to happen. Not under any circumstances. It's natural Conservative territory, that was won by the Lib Dems because of a large personal vote for the Lib Dem MP. The constituency Labour Party is essentially a joke.

If the Lib Dem vote goes up nationally, then it moves from being a Lib Dem/Tory marginal to being a Lib Dem safe seat (or as safe as anything ever is for the Lib Dems). If the Labour Party vote goes down nationally (over 10%, according to the figures), the Labour Party is going to struggle to hold on to its deposit. With Sutton and Cheam portrayed as going Lib Dem, it becomes even more nonsensical. It's quite possible for S&C to go Lib Dem. It did in 1997. But it's a tougher ask for the Lib Dem than C&W. If S&C is LD, then C&W is as well.

As always, the Devil is in the details, and the details here for this part are gibberish. I can accept, as some sort of magic wand waving, the LD taking 171 seats in 2010. But that map is nonsense on stilts in the areas I know.
From what's been said elsewhere, I'm pretty sure the map and result are based on something from an online UK campaign trail election game. So I'm assuming that most of the strange results are a result of that, but it still suggests that game has been programmed in a... questionable manner.

Locally for example Derbyshire Dales would fall before either NE or S Derbyshire, and Sherwood before Bassetlaw. Not to mention the amusing, but probably quite realistic all things considered, situation of the Conservatives keeping Bosworth but loosing Harborough.
 

King of Wessex

Selina Meyer 2020
I haven't posted any of the infoboxes that I have made over the last ten months, and as 99% of them are British infoboxes, they should hopefully be of interest to many members of this forum.

To start with, here's a Thatcher comeback.

View attachment 15568
Going against doctor's advice, Margaret Thatcher wants to have an active role in politics again and decides to renounce her peerage in 2001 in order to take a seat in Parliament.

John Major, who succeeded Margaret Thatcher as Leader of the Conservative Party and Prime Minister, was standing down from the House of Commons in the 2001 election, and so Thatcher wants to become the next Conservative Party candidate for Huntingdon. She manages to get the candidacy and wins the seat with a higher Conservative vote count than IOTL.

William Hague, the Conservative Party leader from 1997 who succeeded Major, resigns the leadership after only managing a net gain of one seat in the election. The Conservatives elect Iain Duncan Smith to succeed him, as they do IOTL. Just like our timeline, the Conservatives soon realise that Duncan Smith will fail to win the next election so badly that the Tories may end up losing seats.

The vote of no confidence in Iain Duncan Smith passes, and he is forced out of his position, but not before the next leader is elected. Michael Howard runs for the Leadership of the Party, but so does Mrs Thatcher. Against all the odds, by the final ballot, Margaret Thatcher wins the leadership for the second time, regaining the leadership 30 years after she was first elected.

She becomes the Leader of the Opposition for the second time, and despite stating that "The Prime Minister has shown strong, bold leadership; standing strong together with President Bush', she pledged that she would strike harder against opposition forces.

Surprisingly, these words seemed to work in the environment of a massively Labour dominated Parliament, and in 2005 the Conservatives managed to win a majority of 6. Tony Blair attempts to stay on as Labour Leader and Leader of the Opposition, but he is soon replaced by John Prescott.

Thatcher becomes one of the oldest elected Prime Ministers in history at the age of 79, and, after leading the Conservatives to a shock second victory in 2009 by a majority of 30, she becomes the oldest elected British Prime Minister, at the age of 83. It is worth mentioning after this election result John Prescott resigns as Labour leader and is replaced by David Miliband. A year after this victory, Thatcher appoints George Osborne as her Deputy Prime Minister.

Thatcher was preparing for the 2013 General election, where, just a month before the election, in April 2013, she suffers a fatal stroke at the age of 87. If elected, she would have been one of the oldest democratically elected leaders in history. An emergency leadership election is held, with George Osborne becoming Leader of the Conservative Party and Prime Minister the day after, unopposed.
The issue with that, although it's a cool (but deeply horrifying) idea, is that Thatcher developed dementia. She wouldn't have been able to be Prime Minister right until her death I think
 

Comrade TruthTeller

So much for hope in politics.
Location
Pinner, London
Pronouns
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Didn't notice that.

Um, that's not going to happen. Not under any circumstances. It's natural Conservative territory, that was won by the Lib Dems because of a large personal vote for the Lib Dem MP. The constituency Labour Party is essentially a joke.

If the Lib Dem vote goes up nationally, then it moves from being a Lib Dem/Tory marginal to being a Lib Dem safe seat (or as safe as anything ever is for the Lib Dems). If the Labour Party vote goes down nationally (over 10%, according to the figures), the Labour Party is going to struggle to hold on to its deposit. With Sutton and Cheam portrayed as going Lib Dem, it becomes even more nonsensical. It's quite possible for S&C to go Lib Dem. It did in 1997. But it's a tougher ask for the Lib Dem than C&W. If S&C is LD, then C&W is as well.

As always, the Devil is in the details, and the details here for this part are gibberish. I can accept, as some sort of magic wand waving, the LD taking 171 seats in 2010. But that map is nonsense on stilts in the areas I know.
Yes - the Lib Dems take North Durham but not Redcar?
I know that there will be some errors in that map (other than the inaccuracies), but I should have included that I did not make up these results at all and these were generated by Prime Minister Infinity. Personally the result that I found most disbelievable was Corbyn losing his seat, given how safe it is, and I know that that was one of the seats I didn't screw up. Also the fact that a bunch of seats had a majority of one was quite odd.
 

David Flin

A home of love and laughter.
I know that there will be some errors in that map (other than the inaccuracies), but I should have included that I did not make up these results at all and these were generated by Prime Minister Infinity.
It doesn't matter who made the errors, the errors are there.

Fiction is generally about the willing suspension of disbelief by the reader. Different readers draw the line at which they can no longer go along with the fiction in different places. For example, Jules Verne and HG Wells had a difference of opinion about disbelief over how the other got people to the Moon. Verne wanted Wells to display some cavorite that had gravity-opaquing properties, because he couldn't accept Unobtanium suddenly being brought into existence. He used gunpowder at big cannons to get his men to the Moon. The effect of a launch on these men under such circumstances is left as an exercise for the reader.

In this case, it doesn't matter who decided that Carshalton and Wallington would be won by the Labour Party, that was the point that I couldn't take it seriously. It just isn't going to happen, and certainly not under the circumstances described. My willing suspension of disbelief died at that point.

Now, if you'd not shown the map, and just said that a number of seats had been won and lost, without specifying which seats until the plot required, then you would have had less of a problem. By presenting an unnecessary level of detail, the invitation was made to examine that level of detail, and the conclusion several people came to was that it's nonsense. For your story, you don't need that level of detail. It doesn't matter whether C&W is held by LD, Labour, or Conservative. Putting it in simply causes grief.

That's where an author needs to decide what level of detail is needed. It will depend on what one is trying to achieve. In Six East End Boys, for example, I gloss over how one gets from the POD in 1984 to the start of the story in around 2014 (plus or minus). Those details aren't important for the story, just the general feeling. If someone were to say that it's hard to get from the POD to the start of the story, I would agree. If that's a deal-breaker for a reader, then that reader is not part of my target audience.
 

Comrade TruthTeller

So much for hope in politics.
Location
Pinner, London
Pronouns
He/him
I have removed the map because of it's inaccuracies. I was very tired when I made it and I don't know where each constituency is so I relied entirely on both the mapchart website and the PMI game. Apologies for said problems. I'll refrain from making maps in the future as they will all be prone to the same errors as this one [for those that I can make, 2010 to 2019]. I know I should be using the maps from Wikipedia, and I was being lazy by using a map maker.
 

Alex Richards

She needs an artificial Mountain, not AV
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
I have removed the map because of it's inaccuracies. I was very tired when I made it and I don't know where each constituency is so I relied entirely on both the mapchart website and the PMI game. Apologies for said problems. I'll refrain from making maps in the future as they will all be prone to the same errors as this one [for those that I can make, 2010 to 2019]. I know I should be using the maps from Wikipedia, and I was being lazy by using a map maker.
For the record, the map quality was fine, no problems at all with the map maker, it was just the results.

Also the Lib Dems had control of Islington Council between 1999 and 2006, and managed to get the Labour majority down to 21% in 2005. It's not entirely unbelievable that a Labour collapse like that would see it narrowly flipping.
 

Comrade TruthTeller

So much for hope in politics.
Location
Pinner, London
Pronouns
He/him
Here's a quick one.

The demise of Alan Turing is an especially depressing one, having been chemically castrated, stripped of his clearances, and kept a secret for decades after his death, all only because of his orientation, so here's an infobox with multiple PODs. The first is that Christopher Morcom (Alan Turing's real life first love) doesn't die in 1930 of bovine tuberculosis. Secondly, either homosexuality is legalised before what would have been his gross indecency charge, or he is never charged for gross indecency in the 50s. Thirdly, Alan Turing doesn't die in the 50s (whether that was suicide or not is up for debate). Morcom and Turing live into their hundreds, seeing the legalisation of homosexuality in 67, enter a civil partnership in 2004 at the age of 92 and 93, and become the oldest couple to marry in 2014, at the ages of 102 and 103. Turing and Morcom both die in 2016 at the ages of 104 and 105.
1577662228925.png
 

Alex Richards

She needs an artificial Mountain, not AV
Patreon supporter
Published by SLP
Location
Derbyshire
View attachment 16417
Another result made from Prime Minister Infinity, the first time I tried to play the game as Boris Johnson and this happened. Looking at it, the numbers don't quite make sense.
Looks like it goes a bit screwy with Scotland, but these things often do.

Would actually be interested in a list of the seats Labour doesn't win from that- a Labour win on that scale means that you might well see odd results from the Conservatives utterly collapsing in terms of where the Lib Dems or UKIP win.
 

Comrade TruthTeller

So much for hope in politics.
Location
Pinner, London
Pronouns
He/him
1578579835602.png
This one speaks for itself. Jimmy White doesn't fluff the red and goes on to make the biggest break of the match. This win gives him the mental strength to break the Crucible curse in 1995, and win an additional two times after that.

Now that this is on SLP, I hope that more people will understand this infobox!
 
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Comrade TruthTeller

So much for hope in politics.
Location
Pinner, London
Pronouns
He/him
A Bit of Fry in the Lobbies
Last one for the day. Would like some feedback on this one as well.

Following the results of the 1992 United Kingdom General Election, prominent actor, writer and comedian Stephen Fry decides to enter the world of politics. The general election resulted in a surprise Conservative majority of 23 seats. Fry's decision to enter politics was, as he later told journalists, heavily influenced by the result in his constituency of birth, Hampstead and Highgate. The new Conservative candidate, the little known Oliver Letwin, managed to succeed his party colleague Geoffrey Finsburg as Member of Parliament, This confounded the swing of the overall election, and Letwin managed to hold the seat for the Conservatives with a majority of 12 votes over the Labour candidate, former actress Glenda Jackson. This made Hampstead and Highgate the most marginal seat in the country that year.

Though he was entering the world of politics, Fry was still part of A Bit of Fry and Laurie when he made the announcement. He stated that he would attempt to be selected as the Labour Party candidate for his home constituency of Hampstead and Highgate. Thankfully for Fry, Glenda Jackson stated that she did not want to try for selection again, and Fry was easily selected to become the new Labour Party candidate. A Bit of Fry and Laurie came to an end in 1995, before the next election was held, for reasons unrelated to Fry's political career. Later episodes of the series would make reference to Fry's new coming career.

Eventually, the next election came in 1997, and Labour were sweeped into power with a phenominal landslide like none ever seen before. Oliver Letwin lost his seat by a colossal margin, by such a margin in fact that from then on Hampstead and Highgate was a safe seat. Stephen Fry's election to parliament was a highly publicised event, and all of the main news outlets had cameras inside the count for the seat. The new Labour Prime Minister, Tony Blair, did at times meet with Stephen Fry to see if he was interested in becoming a minister, but Fry always politely declined.

By the time that the Iraq War came around, Stephen Fry became extremely disillusioned with the Labour leadership, and became one of Labour's most fierce backbenchers. From the time shortly after the September 11th attacks, he had formed a close partnership with similarly inclined backbench MPs John McDonnell and Jeremy Corbyn, and became one of the inaugural co-chairs of the Stop the War Coalition in September 2001 along with Andrew Murray, a post he would serve for the ensuing 14 years, later co-chairing with Corbyn. Along with McDonnell, Corbyn and Dennis Skinner, he voted against the Iraq War. He came very close to resigning from the Labour Party, but decided that he would try to reform it from within.

By 2007, he was openly calling for Tony Blair to resign the leadership of the party, and openly celebrated his resignation when Blair eventually announced it in May of that year. His fierce opposition to the Labour leadership came to an end on 27 June 2007, when one Gordon Brown acceeded to the Labour throne, and therefore also as Prime Minister. Brown, who promised to be a different political figure to Blair, offered Fry a cabinet post in the cabinet reshuffle, and, with Blair out of the picture, Fry accepted. Succeeding Tessa Jowell, Stephen Fry rather appropriately becomes the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, though he focused on Culture and Media and left the Sport aspect mainly to his under-secretaries and appointed ministers. His work in this field as Culture Secretary was highly praised from both sides of the house.

Sadly for Fry, this would last less than three years, as Labour were booted out of power in 2010 by the combined forces of David Cameron and Nick Clegg. The coalition that ensued ended 13 years of Labour government. One more time, as soon as the result became clear, he did not partake in the Harman Caretaker Shadow Cabinet, and returned to the backbenches for the second time. When the new leader, Ed Miliband, was elected, he continued to stay on the backbenches and declined an offer of Shadow Health. Interestingly, he continued to do TV during this time, and had hosted the show QI amongst other things since September 2003. He had, in fact, hosted the show even during his tenure as Culture Secretary.

Although on the backbenches between 2010 and 2015, he made a number of memorable interventions during this time. He loudly voiced his praise for the government's gay marriage pledge, and celebrated both when the bill legalising it was enshrined in the law in July 2013, and when same-sex marriages began being conducted in March of 2014. In September 2013, Fry called on the Prime Minister to facilitate a boycott of the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia due to their stance on gay rights, during a session of Prime Minister's Question Time. The Prime Minister stated that he did not intend to boycott the Olympics for this, but did state that he would try to bring up the issue in a number of other ways. Naturally, Fry was not contended with this answer, and later wrote to the PM. In 2014 he publically campaigned for a No vote in the Scottish independence referendum, which saw a surprisingly comfortable 58 to 42 margin against independence. In January 2015, he married his partner, Elliot Spencer, in a ceremony that he wanted to keep quiet, but was leaked to the press.

However, his days on the backbenches would soon come to an end as the Conservatives secured a surprise majority in the 2015 general election. Labour lost 30 seats, and the Lib Dems had collapsed, the latter being the main reason behind the Conservatives' surprise majority. During the 2015 election campaign, Cameron had intended to do an interview with the BBC ruling out running for a third termin the event of a victory in the coming election, but after mulling it over with his wife Samantha, he decided against it. After the election results became clear, David Cameron managed to continue on being the Prime Minister. However, this came at a price. Cameron had promised to hold an in/out referendum on the continued membership of the European Union. And this was a promise that he intended to keep. As a europhile, it was a big gamble indeed.

Meanwhile, Miliband had resigned the leadership of the party, and Harriet Harman was left leading a caretaker shadow administration in the meantime, for a second and final time. Harman, who had been Deputy Leader since the accession of Gordon Brown to the premiership, was now resigning. MP for West Bromwich East, Tom Watson, considered standing in the race for the deputy leadership, but eventually declined to run. The frontrunner, Stella Creasy, eventually succeeded in winning the Deputy Leadership by quite a margin. Tom Watson would later write that he completely regretted not standing in the 2015 Deputy Leadership election, as he thought he would have had a very good chance of winning it if he had run.

While this was going on, Stephen Fry was thinking that he might be the person to lead the Labour Party into the next election, and consulted with comrades McDonnell and Corbyn to get a consensus. McDonnell (who had run for the leadership in 2007 and 2010, neither time getting the required nominations to get on the allot) and Corbyn (who had been considering a run for the leadership this time) agreed to let Fry stand for the leadership. Before long, Fry announced his intention to contest the leadership election, a decision which attracted a large amount of media attention. His run was endorsed by McDonnell and seconded by Corbyn. Soon, he amassed the required nominations in order to get onto the ballot. Polling was conducted, and amongst the other candidates; Andy Burnham, Yvette Cooper and Liz Kendall, Stephen Fry consistently came out on top. Fry campaigned to take the Labour Party somewhat more leftward.

In September 2015, the leadership results were announced, and Stephen Fry was elected in the first round on 65.3% of the vote, a landslide. Though the election result was not very much in doubt, the amount that Fry eventually won by was not expected. Stephen Fry was now the Leader of the Opposition and the Leader of the Labour Party, the first openly gay major party leader in the country. With his new job as leading the alternative to the government, Stephen Fry resigned from QI shortly after he was anointed the new Leader of the Labour Party. He also soon after resigned the co-chairship of the Stop the War Coalition, succeeded unitarily by Corbyn, who had previously been sharing the job with him. Clashes between Cameron were often humourous and often contained references to Fry's work. Sometimes, Fry would do the voices of some of his characters, with a humourous example being Fry invoking the voice of General Melchett from Blackadder Goes Forth for the entire duration of one session of Prime Minister's Questions, while being almost entirely serious during his questioning of the Prime Minister.

Soon, though, the Brexit referendum would rear its head and the fun and games would stop. Fry became thoroughly involved in the campaign for Remain, and shared a platform with, amongst other people, the Prime Minister, the former hosts of Top Gear, including Jeremy Clarkson who almost launched a political career of his own at the 2015 election, and most of the Liberal Democrats. Thanks to Stephen Fry, some say, the British public voted for Remain, by a margin of 54 to 46, surprisingly close to some people. This was cause for celebration by the forces of the Remain alliance, and severe anger fron the side of the Eurosceptics. Farage knew that he was dead in a ditch at this point, and opted to jump before he was pushed, and resigned the leadership of UKIP. He was soon succeeded by Diane James, UKIP's first woman leader and one who was committed to staying in her job, after some initial quakes. For Stephen Fry, his part in the Brexit referendum was praised from both left and right wings of the pro-EU bloc, for providing both intellectual interventions and times of comedic relief.

Also notable was the knock on effect all this had on the American elections. Some suggested that if Brexit was voted for, that there may have been an increased turn out from Republians who would have had an increased confidence that Donald Trump could be elected. However, with Brexit no longer happening, and with the influence that Fry had had over almost the last 20 years of both culture and politics, one Bernie Sanders became President-elect in November 2016. Although this was met with some disdain from David Cameron to have to work with a self-avowed socialist in the White House, he somewhat welcomed it in the face of his potential alternative. Donald Trump would call the election rigged, and continues to do so even today on his Twitter account.

2017 involved a lot of tensions within Cameron's own Conservative Party, and increasing public outcry at the policies of austerity imposed by the government. 2018 featured much of the same until October of that year. It was at the Conservative Party conference that David Cameron made the surprise announcement that he would plan to call a snap general election for May 2019 under the provisions of the Fixed Term Parliament Act. When Cameron voiced this to the conference, he was met with audible gasps. The Conservatives weren't too steadily in front in the polls, and in fact in some polls they were trending below Labour. When this announcement came, polling began noticably shifting.

Cameron, who was closing in on nine consecutive years of rule as the Prime Minister of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, could not go back on this promise and by March 2019 he moved the bill under the provisions of the Fixed Terms Parliament Act. This was voted for overwhelmingly by almost every MP of every party, with only 10 MPs voting against, mainly Conservatives. Stephen Fry laid out his party's manifesto, which included commitments to many socialist policies, and also the rescindment of the Fixed Term Parliament Act, and the reinstatement of the amended Septennial Act; in other words how elections worked prior to the coalition's FTPA. Cameron and Osborne knew that there was no longer any turning back, as parliament had already been dissolved.

This was when a series of gaffes started turning the tides in favour of Labour, including a second Bigotgate, where Cameron was caught saying a voter was racist when he thought his microphone was off, after she had told him that she was voting for Diane James' UK Independence Party after decades of voting Conservative. By the time that polling day came along, Labour were in a consistent lead. The exit poll was released at 10:00PM, which suggested that Labour would be the largest party but short of a majority. This was met with jubilation from the Labour headquarters, and scenes of fear and dread in the Conservative HQ. Scenes were also positive in the Liberal Democrats' headquarters, where they were expected to at least double their seat count, at the expense entirely of the Conservatives.

Seats like Broxtowe, the seat of the Health Secretary Anne Soubry, began to fall back to Labour, as they had been before 2010. North East Somerset, seat of prominent backbencher Jacob Rees-Mogg, also fell to Labour, and returning candidate Dan Norris gained the seat in a surprising result. It soon became apparent that Labour could achieve a majority after all, and at 6AM, Labour indeed crossed the threshold of 326 seats in the House of Commons, The Conservatives led by David Cameron had been defeated, and the Labour Party had been victorious, and Stephen Fry was now on his way to Downing Street.

The inner rumblings of the Conservative Party made itself known almost immediately, with outgoing Somerset MP Rees-Mogg calling for Cameron's head immediately. At the end of the day, Labour managed a surprising majority of 24, and managed to win 338 seats overall, up 106 from 2015. Cameron made one final speech at Downing Street where he said that while of course he found the election results disappointing, that he wished Stephen the best of luck for his future as Prime Minister. He said that, while he would not stand down immediately, he would indeed resign the leadership of the Conservative Party once his successor had been elected. He paid tribute to the five years of coalition with the Liberal Democrats from 2010 to 2015, and particularly to the four years of Conservative majority government from 2015 to 2019, stating that he believed that the country was in a very much better state than how it had been left to them nine years earlier. He paid tribute to the social reforms that they had been able to enact in the nine years of Conservative-led government, especially his achievement of same-sex marriage.

After this, the Prime Minister, his wife Samantha and their three children Nancy, Arthur and Florence, made their way into the Prime Ministerial car to Downing Street. There the Prime Minister went to meet the Queen to tender his resignation and recommend that she send for Stephen Fry. This was naturally accepted, and, after saying one final goodbye to her Majesty, left the building as David Cameron, MP. With his family, he then returned to his Witney constituency in a private car. It was not long before a private car carrying Stephen Fry and his husband Elliot arrived at Downing Street, the Prime Ministerial car waiting to take them both to Downing Street after he was appointed. The self-avowed royalist then met with Her Majesty the Queen, who asked him to form the new government, which Stephen Fry obviously accepted. The new Prime Minister explained what he was intending for his government to achieve in the next five years or so to Her Majesty, kissed hands, and then left Buckingham Palace. The Prime Minister and his husband Elliot then entered the Prime Ministerial car where they were taken to Downing Street, where an almost Blair-like crowd was waiting at the gates of Downing Street. Like Blair (in one of the only ways), he prematurely exited the car to shake hands with the crowd with Elliot.

After walking his way while shaking hands with the crowd, the sixty-one year-old Prime Minister made the first speech of his premiership, with his husband watching closely. He set out his intentions for the next five years, briefing the world what policies would be enacted. He paid tribute to some of the reforms that had been enacted by the outgoing government, especially that of same-sex marriage that David Cameron had also touched on. He announced that he would govern in the interests of those in need, and before long he finished his speech. Outside the door of Downing Street, the Prime Minister and his husband kissed for the cameras. After this, they both entered Downing Street, and the Prime Minister started the work of government.

First off, the letters of last resort. Secondly, the cabinet. Alan Johnson, a remnant of the days of New Labour, had intended to retire at the election after 2015, whenever that was held, but when Stephen Fry acceeded to the Labour leadership, he was persuaded otherwise with a shadow cabinet post. He was made First Secretary of State. The new Chancellor of the Exchequer, succeding George Osborne, was Ed Miliband, Fry's predecessor as leader of the Labour Party. The new Home Secretary, succeeding Theresa May, was John McDonnell, one of Stephen Fry's closest political allies. The new Foreign Secretary, succeeding Philip Hammond, was Lisa Nandy. Jeremy Corbyn was made Health Secretary. The first telephone call made was to the 45th President of the United States, Bernie Sanders. President Sanders congratulated Fry on his election victory, and stated that he knew that they would be working closely together in the future. Meanwhile in the states, Bernie was going for a second term and Donald Trump, Mike Pence, and Jeb Bush were fighting it out for the Republican nomination, in a race that was expected to be a very close-run thing.

This was seven months ago, and it is now January 2020. Stephen Fry is still the Prime Minister, but things have changed in the opposition. In July 2019, David Cameron's successor was elected. The five main candidates to succeed David Cameron were Theresa May, Philip Hammond, George Osborne, Boris Johnson and 79-year-old Kenneth Clarke. The run-off ended up being Philip Hammond and Boris Johnson, and the former Foreign Secretary managed to win by a margin of 15,000 votes in an extremely close membership vote. Philip Hammond is seen as a rather boring figure who was always after George Osborne's job. Meanwhile, after the over-doubling of the Lib Dem representation at the election, Tim Farron pledged to stay on until at least the next election. The repeal of the Fixed Term Parliament Act was started a couple days ago, when parliament reconvened for the first time after the Christmas break. At the same time, the amnended Septennial Act has been introduced to make sure that the powers were restored to what they were before. I have noticed trains in BR Blue and Grey starting to roll out across the National Rail system. My local Chiltern Railways was one of the first to go British Rail, apparently. I'd be here for quite a while though, going through all of the changes that I've noticed. The rest, as they say, is history.

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