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Chains of Consequences: the Perils of Choosing a Veep

Thande

Shadow Minister for Generic Nice Things
Published by SLP
#21
Geography, sometimes called 'diversity' at the time, used to be a significant factor in both presidential politics and supreme court appointments, but it hasn't been a big factor in selection for a long time now. Probably the last presidential nominee who made geography a big factor was Dukakis with Bentsen, and that didn't translate in any relevant way. Kerry as well perhaps, and the same applies.

In step with the development of the role in recent decades there's been a significant growth in 'what a nominee can bring in government' as a factor in selection rather than bald electoral considerations, which was a big factor in the selection of Gore, Cheney and Biden.
I was going to say, I think Kerry-Edwards was the last gasp of the geographic approach, although it becomes slightly blurred whether you're talking about a region or a demographic ("white southern traditional Democrats" or whatever).
 

Francisco Cojuanco

Well-known member
Location
Arizona
#22
Geography, sometimes called 'diversity' at the time, used to be a significant factor in both presidential politics and supreme court appointments, but it hasn't been a big factor in selection for a long time now. Probably the last presidential nominee who made geography a big factor was Dukakis with Bentsen, and that didn't translate in any relevant way. Kerry as well perhaps, and the same applies.

In step with the development of the role in recent decades there's been a significant growth in 'what a nominee can bring in government' as a factor in selection rather than bald electoral considerations, which was a big factor in the selection of Gore, Cheney and Biden.
There was a belief Clinton in part picked Gore to up his Bubba quotient as well, to show that they were still seriously pursuing the Southern vote.
 
#23
I was going to say, I think Kerry-Edwards was the last gasp of the geographic approach, although it becomes slightly blurred whether you're talking about a region or a demographic ("white southern traditional Democrats" or whatever).
Worth bearing in mind NC had been foreseen as an eventual swing state as far back as the eighties, and would flip in the next cycle, Virginia as well, so not as totally ridiculous a pick as people might assume, even though the result turned out to be pretty emphatic for Bush. Florida was also assumed to be more relevant than it turned out to be.

Edwards was the firm second choice behind McCain, so the overall selection process does affirm the diminished importance of geography.