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Biaggi’s Other Opium Den

Burton K Wheeler

The G.O.A.T. That Can't Be Got
Location
Tr'ondëk
...
You could also say Lloyd Austin as a four-star super establishment type (and also black). Austin isn't someone I can picture running for President with the personality and attitude he has, but maybe he happens to be in command of something important during a high-profile event and the Republicans draft him the way they did Eisenhower.
...
Turns out my take on Lloyd Austin as black Eisenhower was on the money.
 

gentleman biaggi

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Random List Time:

Dwight D. Eisenhower/Richard Nixon (Republican) 1953-1955
Dwight D. Eisenhower/
vacant (Republican) 1955-1957

1952 Def. Adlai Stevenson/John Sparkman (Democratic)
Alfred Gruenther/Walter Judd (Republican) 1957-1961
1956 Def. Happy Chandler/Frank Clement (Democratic), T. Coleman Andrews/Thomas Werdel (State's Rights), William Langer/Chester Roberts (Prohibition)
Frank Clement/Frank Hogan (Democratic) 1961-1966
Frank Hogan/
none (Democratic) 1966-1967
Frank Hogan/Maurine Neuberger (Democratic) 1967-1969

1960 Def. Alfred Gruenther/Walter Judd (Republican), unpledged electors (Southern Democratic)
1964 Def. Walter Judd/James T. McDermott (Republican), Orval Faubus/Ross Barnett (State's Rights)
Wendell Corey/Vernon Thompson (Republican) 1969-1977
1968 Def. Price Daniel/George McGovern (Democratic)
1972 Def. Wally Barron/Clark Clifford (Democratic), Jesse Gray/Zolton Ferency (People's)
Johnny Cash/Bud Zumwalt (Democratic) 1977-1985
1976 Def. Vernon Thompson/Thomas Moorer (Republican) Warren Rudman/John Chafee (True Republican)
1980 Def. Ben Bubar/Jack Zink (Republican)
 

gentleman biaggi

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For the longest time, the city of San Francisco was, like many other urban areas, dominated by a Republican machine. While there had been some power held by both the Nativist Union Labor party and the national Democrats, the two's power collapsed when an attempt was made to merge the two, isolating both the UL's anti-immigrant base and the Democratic Party's immigrant base. From 1910 to 1976, the Republican party held power in San Francisco, with a machine that destroyed the Union power the city once held. Only once during this time had a non-Republican coalition even held control of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, which happened in 1922, when the Democratic-Union Labor party (or DUL) formed an unsteady coalition with the Socialist and Prohibition parties.

However, things had changed during the 1970s, with San Francisco growing as an urban area, and the more socially liberal policies of Mayor Jonas Williams[1] allowing for a greater migration of LGBT individuals to join an already quite diverse community in San Francisco. These things, along with the rising leftism of the 1970s and the 1974 San Francisco Rent Strike allowed for populist Allan K. Jordan to win the Mayoral Election with his own local party, the San Francisco Progressive Party, with a coalition of Black, Latino, LGBT, and left wing white voters, who had aligned with the rent strike and then the SFPP.

As one machine left power, a new one emerged, however, the San Francisco Progressives appeared to be much less stable than the Republicans who preceded them. The first obstacle was that many more traditional labor voters disliked the growth of LGBT rights in the city, particularly as many leading members of the SFPP were gay. Businesses, who didn't mind LGBT customers making them money, began to dislike the growth of the IWW and the "People's Liberation Church" in San Francisco, who all promoted left wing causes and often disrupted businesses. This opposition was only helped by two left-wing split off groups, the White Panther Party, a group of left wing activists who attempted to fashion themselves as the same as Oakland's Black Panthers, were furious when Mayor Jordan refused to immediately legalize marijuana and passed a gun control ordinance, causing the groups formation as an actual political party (they were only an activist group who called themselves a "party" before) in 1981. Another even more minor split, saw the creation of the Worker's Party, a political party that espoused Communism and decried Jordan's policies as "Bourgeois faux-leftism".

Despite these splits, Jordan remained popular with much of the city, and was helped to re-election in 1979, 1983, and 1987 by some, *ahem* maneuvers used by the IWW and People's Liberation Church, both major allies. However, when Jordan announced his retirement from public office in 1990, the San Francisco Progressives began to split. For years the party had held a much more minor wing that detested Jordan's more left-wing economic policies, but stood behind his moves for progress on social issues. However, when Jordan was replaced by a much more unpopular and politically unskilled crony named John West, this wing of the party revolted, and formed the San Francisco Green Party. New leader Eileen D. Cobb began to run as an "Anti-Machine" alternative to the Progressives, and attacked them for "fiscal irresponsibility" and for not promoting "Green Businesses". Ironically, Cobb's party began to pick up many old white Republican voters, causing a nearly full-scale collapse of the Republican Party, as they fell behind even the White Panthers and Workers Parties, especially when the United Party was started by Asian-American businessman Song Tung in 1994, and promptly scooped up many Asian voters who had been the last thing keeping San Francisco Republicans alive.

While the Greens provided a strong opposition to the Progressives, it still took years before they could fully defeat the Progressive Machine. It wasn't until 2002 that the Progressives lost their majority in the Board of Supervisors, and even then they just responded by forming an insane coalition with the DUL and the White Panther Party that provided San Francisco with a period of heavy business regulations, the end of the "Jordan Gun Control Law" (which both the WPP and DUL opposed), and a referendum decriminalizing marijuana in the city. However, in 2007, the Greens smelled blood in the water and with a campaign led by Eileen Cobb's husband, George Cobb, were able to take the mayors mansion and in 2008 they won a slim plurality in the Board of Supervisors, which was then propped up by the United Party. Cobb's mayoralty was a strange time for San Francisco, with attempts being made to reinstate Gun Control, go after the increasingly corrupt and splitting People's Liberation Church, and loosen some business regulations while also promoting "Green Business". Cobb faced recall from the White Panthers and the Workers Party in 2009, and while that failed hard, the Greens were shell-shocked in the 2010 board of supervisors elections, losing 10 seats to the Progressives now lead by Allan Jordan's son, Kendrick Jordan, who promptly celebrated this Board of Supervisors election with an announcement that he would be challenging Cobb for mayor in 2011.

Jordan, unsurprisingly, defeated Cobb quite easily, with Unions and the People's Liberation Church backing him hard, and the Progressives were able to regain majority power in the Board of Supervisors. However, the "Lesser Jordan" began to have a similarly transformative time as mayor. He began to co-op many different factions of each platform, moving green energy policy through the Board of Supervisors, getting a referendum to legalize psychedelics, investing into Chinatown and other Asian neighborhoods, and to the surprise of many, going after the People's Liberation Church after the suspicious death of a former member. This caused both a rise in the Worker's Party, who had sucked up much of the People's Liberation Church's support as it went under heavy investigation by Jordan's administration, and the collapse of the Progressive Party's majority in the Board of Supervisors in 2014. This collapse lead to the creation of the "Rainbow Coalition", a coalition of every party in the BoS with the exception of the Worker's Party, who generally agreed on Jordan's policies. Jordan easily won re-election in 2015, and as he continued many more nonpartisan reforms, his popularity has only grown.

However, while Jordan is heavily popular, the Progressives seem to be hurting on a citywide level, especially as Jordan began to campaign less due to the strength of the "Rainbow Coalition". As such, the 2018 Board of Supervisors Election seemed like a premier time for the Greens to take a plurality in San Francisco's legislative body, and push policy more towards their side. George Cobb, the former mayor of San Francisco, had begun to make a political comeback, and took the Green Party's Board of Supervisors leadership position following a surprisingly poor performance in 2016. Cobb, despite being 74 years old, began to campaign heavily, running a campaign that "exerted" energy, even throughout 2017.

However, things were shaken up for the race in February of 2018, when the Democratic-Union Labor convention was held. Aging leader Thomas Vigil, who had forced the DUL into the Rainbow Coalition, faced a challenge from much younger Board of Supervisors member Louis Wallace. Wallace ran a right-wing campaign, and won easily on an anti-Rainbow Coalition platform. The Rainbow Coalition had grown unpopular with members of the DUL, who saw their greatest defeat since 1944 (by percentage of seats held) in 2016, being forced to only 6 seats in the Board of Supervisors, and losing many seats to other Rainbow Coalition candidates. However, the party saw serious potential in the Asian-American community in particular, as the United Party, despite being lead by the same leader, Song Tung, as they always had, had moved to the left after joining the Rainbow Coalition, and in particular many non-Chinese Asian-Americans saw the United Party as increasingly a "Chinese Only" party despite largely being seen as the party of Asian-Americans. The few White voters who voted for the United Party, despite its largely Asian base, voiced the same concerns, and began to look to the DUL as a conservative option. On the campaign trail Wallace attacked Jordan for his "movement away from the people" and for "prioritizing neighborhoods", taking up much of the conservative vote, and looking much stronger than originally expected in original polls, as many also wanted a party that opposed the Rainbow Coalition and wasn't openly Communist.

As the campaign went on, Mayor Jordan began to take a much more active role in campaigning, hoping to save the Progressives, who, after the growth of the DUL, looked like they'd be campaigning more for second place than first. While some were swayed by Kendrick Jordan, who was, after all, quite popular, many didn't really see the need in supporting his Progressives if they were going to be coalitioning with the Greens, and as such, the Cobb campaign held a massive lead throughout the race. Jordan's own machine apparatus that his father had build had been choked out by Jordan, and there were quite a few IWW members who didn't mind the thought of supporting the Workers party. In the end, the Greens took a large plurality, the DUL returned to third party status, the Workers Party continued to fail upwards, and as a result both the Progressives and the United Party took hits. Many expected the so-called Rainbow coalition to completely fall apart, and in a way it did, but the Green, Progressive, Union, and White Panther parties still formed a large governing coalition in San Francisco.

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[1] Generated name, yes this is inspired by Seventh Party system​
 

gentleman biaggi

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Old Habits Die Hard - Or, How William Knowland Broke Richard Nixon
Presidents of the United States [Republic I]:
Richard Nixon/Spiro Agnew (Republican) 1969-1973

Def. Hubert Humphrey/Ed Muskie (Democratic), George Wallace/Curtis LeMay (American Independent)
Hubert Humphrey/Milton Shapp (Democratic) 1973-1974

Milton Shapp/vacant (Democratic) 1974-1974
Milton Shapp/Robert Docking (Democratic) 1974-1977
Def. Richard Nixon/Spiro Agnew (Republican), John G. Schmitz/Joe Pyne (American Independent)
James Buckley/Robert D. Ray (Republican) 1977-1985
1976 Def. Milton Shapp/Robert Docking (Democratic), Channing Phillips/scattered (D.C. Statehood-National Write-In)
1980 Def. Teno Roncalio/Birch Bayh (Democratic)
Frank Church/Gerald O'Leary (Democratic) 1985-1985
Gerald O'Leary/none (Democratic) 1985-1986
John Conlan/none (Republican) 1986-1986
John Conlan/Jim Smith (Republican/Democratic) 1986-1988
John Conlan/Jim Smith (Republican) 1988-1993

1984 Def. Robert D. Ray/Leo Callahan (Republican)
1988 Def. [Contested] Ed Garvey/Donald Stewart (Democratic), John K. Singlaub/Jeramiah Denton (True Conservative), Frank Zappa/Adam Clayton Powell III (Freak Power), Gerald O'Leary/Scattered ("Anti-Coup" candidate, cross endorsed by New York Tech Party, write-in everywhere else)
John B. Anderson/Lou Papan (Independent, supported by Democratic and Liberty Alternative for More Management) 1993-1997
Def. Jim Smith/Linda Chavez (Republican), Hunter S. Thompson/Oscar Acosta (Freak Power)
Skip Humphrey/James R. Adams (Democratic) 1997-2001
Def. John K. Singlaub/Dan Lungren (Republican), Lester Lessig/Ron Paul (1776 Party)
 

gentleman biaggi

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Avoiding Saint Patrick: Bobby Kennedy and the Anglo-American Split

Presidents of the United States:
Robert F. Kennedy/Vance Hartke (Democratic) 1969-1977

1968 Def. Richard Nixon/Robert Finch (Republican), George Wallace/Joe Pyne (American Independent)
1972 Def. Richard Ogilvie/Ed Fike (Republican), George Wallace/John Rarick (American Independent)

Paul Eggers/Wendell Corey (Republican) 1977-1978
Paul Eggers/none (Republican) 1978-1978
Paul Eggers/Louis Frey (Republican) 1978-1985
1976 Def. Vance Hartke/Carl Sanders (Democratic), Channing Phillips/Ron Dellums (Citizens)
1980 Def. Howard Samuels/Gale McGee (Democratic)
William Hudnut/Mike Curb (Republican) 1985-1989
Def. Foster Campbell/Deborah Anderson (Democratic)
Aurelia Pucinski/Ron Beitelspacher (Democratic) 1989-1997

1988 Def. William Hudnut/Mike Curb (Republican), Ted Brown/Fred Koch (Libertarian)
1992 Def. Allen Kolstad/Evan Galbraith (Republican), Ken Fanning/Charlie Earl (Libertarian), Tom Roeser/Richard Allen (True Conservative)
David Eisenhower/Ken Eikenberry (Republican) 1997-2001
Def. Ron Beitelspacher/Ben Jones (Democratic)
Thomas Andrews/Richard Scruggs (Democratic) 2001-2002
Richard Scruggs/none (Democratic) 2002-2003
Richard Scruggs/Maurice Hinchey (Democratic) 2003-2009
2000 Def. David Eisenhower/Ken Eikenberry (Republican), Shawn O'Hara/Bob Smith (Freedom)
2004 Def. Randy Daniels/Bill Jones (Republican)
Phil Collins/Harvey Peeler (Republican) 2009-2017
2008 Def. Jim Folsom Jr./Jim Rex (Democratic)
2012 Def. Zach Scruggs/Paul Wellstone (Democratic)
Deborah Anderson/Brandon Pressley (Democratic) 2017-????
Def. Harvey Peeler/Ken Knuppe (Republican)
 

gentleman biaggi

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Political Career of Lester G. Maddox:

1957: Unsuccessful Candidate for Mayor of Atlanta, Nonpartisan
Lost to: William Hartsfield (Nonpartisan)
1958-1960: Private Citizen, Democratic
1961: Unsuccessful Candidate for Mayor of Atlanta, Nonpartisan
Def. (1st Rnd) Ivan Allen (Nonpartisan), Charlie Brown (Nonpartisan), Muggsy Smith (Nonpartisan), James Aldredge (Nonpartisan)
Lost to: (2nd Rnd) Ivan Allen (Nonpartisan)

1962: Unsuccessful Candidate for Lt. Governor of Georgia, Democratic
Def. (1st Rnd, Primary): Peter Zack Geer (Democratic), Peyton Hawes (Democratic), Ed Wilson (Democratic), John Sheffield (Democratic), Winston Burdine (Democratic), Spence Grayson (Democratic)
Lost to: (2nd Rnd, Primary): Peter Zack Geer (Democratic)

1963-1965: Private Citizen, Democratic
1966: Successful Candidate for Governor of Georgia, Democratic
Def. (1st Rnd, Primary): Ellis Arnall (Democratic), Jimmy Carter (Democratic), James Gray (Democratic), Garland Byrd (Democratic)
Def. (2nd Rnd, Primary): Ellis Arnall (Democratic)
Def. (Gen.): Bo Callaway (Republican), Ellis Arnall (Write-In)

1967-1971: Governor of Georgia, Democratic
1970: Successful Candidate for Lt. Governor of Georgia, Democratic
Def. (Primary): George T. Smith (Democratic), Charlie Jones (Democratic), D.F. Glover (Democratic)
Def. (Gen.): Frank G. Miller (Republican)

1971-1972: Lt. Governor of Georgia, Democratic
1972-1973: Lt. Governor of Georgia, American Independent
1973-1975: Lt. Governor of Georgia, Democratic
1972: Unsuccessful Candidate for President of the United States, American Independent
Lost to (Conv.)*: John G. Schmitz (American Independent), Allan Greer (American Independent), Tom Anderson (American Independent), Richard B. Kay (American Independent)
1974: Unsuccessful Candidate for Governor of Georgia, Democratic
Def (1st Rnd, Primary): George Busbee (Democratic), Bert Lance (Democratic), David Grambell (Democratic), George T. Smith (Democratic), Harry Jackson (Democratic)
Lost to (2nd Rnd, Primary): George Busbee (Democratic)

1975: Private Citizen, Democratic
1976: Unsuccessful Candidate for President of the United States, American Independent
Def. (Conv.) Robert Morris (American Independent), John Rarick (American Independent)
Running Mate:
William Dyke (American Independent)
Lost to (Gen.): Jimmy Carter (Democratic), Gerald Ford (Republican), Eugene McCarthy (Independent), Roger McBride (Libertarian), Tom Anderson (American), Peter Camejo (Socialist Workers)
1977-1982: Private Citizen, Democratic
1983: Successful Candidate for the House of Representatives in Georgia's 7th Congressional District, Democratic
Def. (1st Rnd, NP Primary): Dave Sellers (Republican), Buddy Darden (Democratic), George Pullen (Democratic), Dan Fincher (Democratic), Peggy Ann Childers (Democratic)
Def. (2nd Rnd, NP Primary): Dave Sellers (Republican)

1983-1989: Representative from Georgia's 7th Congressional District, Democratic
1984 Def. (Gen.): Dave Sellers (Republican)
1986 Def. (Gen.): Ben Clay (Republican)
Lost To: (Primary): Peggy Ann Childers, Dan Fincher (Democratic)

1990-1991: Private Citizen, Democratic
1992: Georgia State Chair of the Allen '92 Presidential Campaign
1992: Successful Candidate for the House of Representatives in Georgia's 7th Congressional District, Republican
Def. (Primary): Ben Clay (Republican)
Def. (Gen.): Peggy Ann Childers (Democratic),
John F. Sugg (Independent)
1993-1995: Representative from Georgia's 7th Congressional District, Republican
1994: Successful Candidate for Governor of Georgia, Republican
Def. (Primary): Paul Heard (Republican), Johnny Isakson (Republican), Benjamin Blackburn (Republican), Ben Clay (Republican)
Def. (Gen.): Bubba McDonald (Democratic), Julian Bond (Progressive)

1995-1999: Governor of Georgia, Republican
1996: Georgia State Chair of the Nelson '96 Presidential Campaign
1998: Unsuccessful Candidate for Governor of Georgia, Republican
Def. (Primary): Benjamin Blackburn (Republican)
Lost to: (Gen.): David Poythress (Democratic), Jack Cashin (Libertarian)

1999-2003: Private Citizen, Republican
 

rosa

Well-known member
Political Career of Lester G. Maddox:

1957: Unsuccessful Candidate for Mayor of Atlanta, Nonpartisan
Lost to: William Hartsfield (Nonpartisan)
1958-1960: Private Citizen, Democratic
1961: Unsuccessful Candidate for Mayor of Atlanta, Nonpartisan
Def. (1st Rnd) Ivan Allen (Nonpartisan), Charlie Brown (Nonpartisan), Muggsy Smith (Nonpartisan), James Aldredge (Nonpartisan)
Lost to: (2nd Rnd) Ivan Allen (Nonpartisan)

1962: Unsuccessful Candidate for Lt. Governor of Georgia, Democratic
Def. (1st Rnd, Primary): Peter Zack Geer (Democratic), Peyton Hawes (Democratic), Ed Wilson (Democratic), John Sheffield (Democratic), Winston Burdine (Democratic), Spence Grayson (Democratic)
Lost to: (2nd Rnd, Primary): Peter Zack Geer (Democratic)

1963-1965: Private Citizen, Democratic
1966: Successful Candidate for Governor of Georgia, Democratic
Def. (1st Rnd, Primary): Ellis Arnall (Democratic), Jimmy Carter (Democratic), James Gray (Democratic), Garland Byrd (Democratic)
Def. (2nd Rnd, Primary): Ellis Arnall (Democratic)
Def. (Gen.): Bo Callaway (Republican), Ellis Arnall (Write-In)

1967-1971: Governor of Georgia, Democratic
1970: Successful Candidate for Lt. Governor of Georgia, Democratic
Def. (Primary): George T. Smith (Democratic), Charlie Jones (Democratic), D.F. Glover (Democratic)
Def. (Gen.): Frank G. Miller (Republican)

1971-1972: Lt. Governor of Georgia, Democratic
1972-1973: Lt. Governor of Georgia, American Independent
1973-1975: Lt. Governor of Georgia, Democratic
1972: Unsuccessful Candidate for President of the United States, American Independent
Lost to (Conv.)*: John G. Schmitz (American Independent), Allan Greer (American Independent), Tom Anderson (American Independent), Richard B. Kay (American Independent)
1974: Unsuccessful Candidate for Governor of Georgia, Democratic
Def (1st Rnd, Primary): George Busbee (Democratic), Bert Lance (Democratic), David Grambell (Democratic), George T. Smith (Democratic), Harry Jackson (Democratic)
Lost to (2nd Rnd, Primary): George Busbee (Democratic)

1975: Private Citizen, Democratic
1976: Unsuccessful Candidate for President of the United States, American Independent
Def. (Conv.) Robert Morris (American Independent), John Rarick (American Independent)
Running Mate:
William Dyke (American Independent)
Lost to (Gen.): Jimmy Carter (Democratic), Gerald Ford (Republican), Eugene McCarthy (Independent), Roger McBride (Libertarian), Tom Anderson (American), Peter Camejo (Socialist Workers)
1977-1982: Private Citizen, Democratic
1983: Successful Candidate for the House of Representatives in Georgia's 7th Congressional District, Democratic
Def. (1st Rnd, NP Primary): Dave Sellers (Republican), Buddy Darden (Democratic), George Pullen (Democratic), Dan Fincher (Democratic), Peggy Ann Childers (Democratic)
Def. (2nd Rnd, NP Primary): Dave Sellers (Republican)

1983-1989: Representative from Georgia's 7th Congressional District, Democratic
1984 Def. (Gen.): Dave Sellers (Republican)
1986 Def. (Gen.): Ben Clay (Republican)
Lost To: (Primary): Peggy Ann Childers, Dan Fincher (Democratic)

1990-1991: Private Citizen, Democratic
1992: Georgia State Chair of the Allen '92 Presidential Campaign
1992: Successful Candidate for the House of Representatives in Georgia's 7th Congressional District, Republican
Def. (Primary): Ben Clay (Republican)
Def. (Gen.): Peggy Ann Childers (Democratic),
John F. Sugg (Independent)
1993-1995: Representative from Georgia's 7th Congressional District, Republican
1994: Successful Candidate for Governor of Georgia, Republican
Def. (Primary): Paul Heard (Republican), Johnny Isakson (Republican), Benjamin Blackburn (Republican), Ben Clay (Republican)
Def. (Gen.): Bubba McDonald (Democratic), Julian Bond (Progressive)

1995-1999: Governor of Georgia, Republican
1996: Georgia State Chair of the Nelson '96 Presidential Campaign
1998: Unsuccessful Candidate for Governor of Georgia, Republican
Def. (Primary): Benjamin Blackburn (Republican)
Lost to: (Gen.): David Poythress (Democratic), Jack Cashin (Libertarian)

1999-2003: Private Citizen, Republican
BASED
 
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